Screen Dumps

Gentlemen:

Is there any TB programming that allows us to send the contents of
the screen to the printer?
In my program, the left third of the screen is filled with stats,
then the middle, then the right third. It appears the ECHO
command would just print everything under each other, leaving the
right half of the paper blank.

- Norm Roth.

Comments

Screen Dumps

Thank you, Tom.

I tried your suggestion, and failed. My TB book is copyrighted
1988 which makes it somewhat out of date. I closed my program by
displaying a full page of stats on my screen. Then I pushed my
prompt to save to a file, then quit. Should this also be
programmed to open the printer? And a catch with all this is my
program is intended for my 11-year-old grandson and his sports-
loving buddies and calling on the Command window is likely not an
option for them.

Do we have any TB programming language that could scan my screen
from left to right so that I could send it to my printer? Is it
possible to report what is showing in each individual row-column
on the screen? If there was, I could write a program that would send the info to the printer. Am I reaching for the stars?!

- Norm Roth.

Re: Screen Dumps

Norm Roth ... I think your problem can be addressed by RUNing your program from the "command line" box at the bottom of your TB Editor screen. Click the box, then type RUN followed by two "greater than" characters (upper case 'period' key) and then press the 'Enter" key.

The screen will sent directly to your printer when you exit your program (Press any key ... prompt).

If you want to send your screen contents to a file instead of your printer, add the name of the file after the two GT characters. Now you've saved the screen file to disk memory and can subsequently print your named file using your favorite text editor.

This process is described in most TB user manuals. Hopefully, it will be retained in any future editions of the TB Language System. Regards ... Tom M

Screen to Printer

from Norm Roth:

While I was having difficulty producing an actual screen dump,
I got around the situation another way. That's the beauty of
computers . . . there always seems to be another way.

Problem solved.

- Norm.